Name that book

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Books in a circle

When it comes to giving your book a title, less is definitely more. (Think Dracula. Emma. Twilight. Ivanhoe. Mockingjay.)
I struggle with two choices for my upcoming sequel to The Anchor Clankers.
1. Anchored in Love
2. Anchored Together
I studied Amazon’s book list to see how many books have the same title and discovered Anchored In Love: An Intimate Portrait of June Carter Cash,” which was published in 2007.

Would that be a problem? Too confusing?

Author Madeleine L’Engle once admitted, “We had to search for the proper name for ‘A Wrinkle in Time,’ and it was my mother who came up with it, during a night of insomnia. I went into her room with a cup of coffee in the morning, and she said, ‘I think I have a title for your book, and it’s right out of the text: A Wrinkle in Time.’ Madeleine goes on to say that many titles had been considered and all vetoed before her mother mentioned A Wrinkle in Time.

I wish I had an insomniac mother who could come up with a great book title.

Shifting traditions

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Thanksgiving retro-

My grandmother set her Thanksgiving table with an Irish lace cloth. I’m not sure that I even own one. (If I do, it’s packed away.) In her eighties, Nana once threw a crystal cranberry dish across the table at my mother because Mom neglected to remove it from the china closet and serve the cranberry sauce in it. A stickler for tradition, that one…
When my children were growing up, we didn’t always live close to family. Today, my daughter lives in Illinois and my son, in Texas, so we are learning to navigate a shifting holiday tradition.
I’ve become a guest, now, rather than a host. It’s delightful to watch them prepare recipes that are meaningful to our family. But I’m also pleased to see their unique additions to the day. Candidly, my daughter-in-law does a better job with appetizers than I ever could.
Screen time with family is wonderful, but nothing replaces being together, the affectionate hugs and the opportunities for reconnecting with one another over a holiday meal.
I hope they will carry forward a few of the cherished holiday traditions of their childhood for the next generation. Unlike my grandmother, I let go of any expectations and – along with the food – I savor the moments, the chance to be together.

 

Renee Garrison is the award-winning author of The Anchor Clankers.

Exercise

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“Renee, have you ever been to SoulCycle?” my daughter-in-law asked innocently.
No, I hadn’t, but when the family gets together, I’ve learned to be flexible. That’s why at 7:30 one recent morning in Chicago, I trudged to a “Breakfast with Beyoncé” class with two daughters-in-law and my daughter. Wearing Lululemon duds borrowed from the girls, I was fitted with cycling shoes that locked into the pedals.
Wow, these look a lot like bowling shoes. (I quickly learned nothing could be farther from the truth.) A fresh, white towel was folded over the handle bars, with a tiny rack beneath it for a water bottle. The lighting was subdued and I was in the back row.  So far, so good.
A pleasant young man with a microphone praised everyone for coming to class and amped up Beyoncé’s “Halo” to a decibel level clearly designed to induce deafness. I spotted an employee wearing a SoulCycle T-shirt, who was prowling the periphery of the room. I waved frantically.
“Did I see a jar of earplugs at the front desk,” I shouted. She said something (God knows I couldn’t hear her) and returned with two yellow cushions in her hand. I inserted them immediately.
That’s when I heard the man giving instructions: Sway to the left. Sway to the right. Tap once. Tap twice. The bodies in the rows ahead of me bobbed up and down like pop tarts in a toaster. I did not, fearing that I might lose my balance and land on the floor while my feet – which were prisoners of the pedals – would continue spinning. I refused to end the family visit with a trip to the ER.
Periodically, my daughter would look over at me and yell, “Are you okay, Mom?”
“Yes,” I bellowed back, wiping sweat from my face and neck. When my towel accidently slipped to the floor, I stared at it. If I bend over to pick that up, I’ll probably land beside it.
Mercifully, the hour ended and I managed to snap my right shoe out of the bike pedal. The left one refused to budge, so I simply removed my foot. The bike shoe continued to cycle, reminding me of those boots in the stirrups of a rider-less horse at military funerals. At least I didn’t die.
We limped back to my daughter’s house (okay, I limped and the girls sauntered) in time for breakfast. My sit bones were sore, but my smile was wide. Guess you can teach an old dog new tricks.

 

 

Renee Garrison is the award-winning author of The Anchor Clankers.

Renee interviews author Deborah Gomer

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Deborah Gomer

Author Deborah Gomer is an oncology nurse, case manager, and health coach. She is also a cancer survivor, who values the extraordinary power of the mind and body. Her award-winning book, The By-Your-Side Cancer Guide, walks readers through diagnosis, treatment, and beyond with honesty and understanding.

Tell me about your background. Where you grew up, where you live now, education, work experience? Share some interesting things about yourself that we should know about.
I grew up in New Jersey, spending summers at the Jersey shore and winters sledding down the hill in our backyard. I loved the changing seasons, but after graduating from New York University and marrying, my husband and I decided to move back to his native Florida. We first settled in South Florida but moved to Jacksonville 16 years ago. We have two adult children who are Florida-grown. Although I miss the changing seasons, I absolutely love living in Jacksonville and am now considered a Florida native.
I have been an oncology nurse for 30 years and am passionate about what I do. Whether it is helping a newly diagnosed patient navigate their care, providing education to staff, or writing an article for a cancer journal, it gives me joy to provide education and support in the cancer community.

What inspired you to write this book? What is the story behind the story?
My husband and my father were sitting around the kitchen table having a discussion about my job. I was explaining what some of my patients go through when they are diagnosed and how I love providing them with tips and suggestions to make their treatment easier. They both looked at me and said, “Debbie, you love to write. Why don’t you write a book for cancer patients?” Being a cancer survivor myself, I thought I could offer something unique—something written through the eyes of someone who has been both the patient and the caregiver. The idea filled me with excitement and I literally started working on the The By-Your-Side Cancer Guide the following day.

What has been your biggest challenge or obstacle?
Oh my, there were so many challenges. First, I needed to research other books for those with a cancer diagnosis, and there were many. I did not want to repeat what others had done, so I made a list of things I felt were missing in these books.
Second, I had no experience writing a book or publishing. I joined several on-line writing communities in order to learn. The local university offers a wonderful array of community classes and I took every publishing class I could find. I decided to self-publish, so I had to really educate myself about the process.
I thought writing would be the biggest challenge, since I was working full time and had an active teenager at home. The writing was actually the best part. The biggest challenge has been marketing. It can be time consuming and is a tremendous challenge for someone with a full time job. I have a blog and use social media and rely a lot on word of mouth.

What has been your biggest “aha” moment or success?
Each time I finished a chapter, I would read it over several times, sometimes putting it down for a few weeks and going back to it. With each read, I would have an aha moment when I would add or edit. But I think the biggest aha moment was when I won two President’s Awards from the Florida Authors and Publishers Association. Up to that point, I felt like a nurse who wrote a book. The award made me feel like an author.

What authors do you like to read? What books have had a strong influence on you or your writing?
I am an avid reader. I read anything I can get my hands on—oncology journals, magazines, cereal boxes. My favorite genre is historical fiction, but I also enjoy writers who make you feel like their characters are real—like you know them intimately. Some of my favorites are Amor Towles, Gail Honeyman, and Fredrik Backman. I am currently reading Donna Tartt’s, Goldfinch, and it is wonderful.

Do you write every single day? Any writing rituals?
I wish I could write every day, but it is difficult keeping a ritual with a full-time job. I try to submit a few articles a year to CONQUER magazine. And I purchased some journals with writing prompts which I hope to start using.

What are your interests outside of writing?
My husband and I enjoy music and are fortunate to have a few outdoor venues that feature amazing local bands. It is our weekend relaxation ritual. I enjoy yoga and try to maintain a daily practice. I also enjoy trying new vegan recipes and growing hydroponic vegetables.

Share some tips for other Authors or Aspiring Authors: What would you do differently? What would you do the same? Please share anything you think would be beneficial to those reading this.
1. Do your homework. Learn as much as you can about the writing and publishing process. Talk to other authors. Join writing groups or online groups.
2. I did not realize how expensive the process of publishing could be when I started and was blown away. At the same time, I wanted my book to be professional. Cost-cutting is understandable but not when it jeopardizes quality. I hired an editor and I hired someone to format the book for me. I had a local graphic designer do the cover. She was happy to be given the opportunity and I got a great deal. I chose to self-publish which allowed me to own my work and the content.
3. Have a marketing plan before you complete the book.

 

Renee Garrison is the award-winning author of The Anchor Clankers.

Um, a sexy lobster?

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sexy
Is it my imagination or are Halloween costumes getting shorter, tighter and riskier? Manufacturers are designing a wider variety of costumes for women that SHOW more skin than they COVER. When did bustiers, fishnet stockings and miniskirts became the norm?
In college I went to a costume party dressed as a bag of jelly beans (multi-colored balloons in a clear plastic dry cleaning bag tied at my neck.) Definitely NOT sexy.
Fashion experts say the shift toward skimpy Halloween costumes took off when American women began embracing a barely-there fashion aesthetic. Enter the era of low-rise jeans, miniskirts, and bandage dresses. Unfortunately, when Britney Spears debuted her single “Baby One More Time” in 1999, she also inspired a new Halloween costume: the sexy schoolgirl. (Sister Mary Margaret was appalled.)
Scanning the racks at the Halloween store, recently, I spotted a “sexy nurse, sexy police woman” and “sexy firefighter.” However, nothing surprised me more than “Sexy Lobster.” And I LOVE lobster. Just not that one.
I read that Google searches for “sexy Halloween costumes” have been declining. That’s good news. (Maybe Daenerys from Game of Thrones, had something to do with it?)

 

Renee Garrison is the award-winning author of The Anchor Clankers.

Attending a writers’ conference

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FWA Conference

Writing is a solitary activity — publishing is not. That means people like me need to network and meet other writers and publishers who share the same enthusiasm for writing as I do.

Regardless of how many novels we sell, there is always something to learn at a writers’ conference. The publishing industry is constantly changing and it’s hard for authors to keep up. Honing our craft is about more than learning proper punctuation, or when to use upper case or italics from the Chicago Manual of Style. These conferences offer the sort of nuts-and-bolts information that can improve our writing and increase our efficiency in the business side of the craft.

Sure, they’re exhausting (and usually involve cold coffee and a chicken dinner.) But I recommend that every aspiring writer attend at least one. Wherever you are on the road to success, you will meet others who have been there and who are ready to help you.

 

Renee Garrison is the award-winning author of The Anchor Clankers.

Renee interviews Author Jayne Rose-Vallee

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Jayne

Jayne M. Rose-Vallee. Jayne is an author and publisher of children’s books. Her mother’s love of poetry and quick-witted humor sparked an early appreciation for a good rhyme. Being raised on a farm taught her hard work and a little bit of dirt builds character. After raising three children on the east side of Detroit, she found time in the next chapter of life to follow her passion and write. The hesitant Jayne was encouraged by her daughter to publish her first book, Dinosaurs Living in My Hair, which catapulted her into a new business venture. Dinosaurs Living in My Hair is now a series with the third book currently being illustrated. The educational DLIMH!2 Coloring Book takes much of her dinosaur research and presents it to children with creativity and fun.

Tell me about your background. Where you grew up, where you live now, education, work experience? Share some interesting things about yourself that we should know about.
I grew up in the Midwest. Attended Michigan State University. Married. Three children before the age of twenty-six. Stay-at-home mom. Volunteered and served on a variety of non-profit boards and community organizations. President of the Mothers’ Club of Grosse Pointe South High School and board of directors. Baked thousands of chocolate chip cookies for children’s athletic teams.
In summer, I cheered from the steamy pool deck; fall I watched from the sidelines of a muddy soccer field; winter I was bundled up under heat lamps in an ice arena; spring I was outside stiff from anxiety holding my breath through tennis rallies. My life was consumed with my family. When the last one went to college, we continued to drive and watch tennis matches, however, life as I knew it shifted.

What inspired you to write this book? What is the story behind the story?
My daughter was an ambassador for Lululemon (she’s an Ironman/triathlete). As training for her ambassadorship, she underwent a program which asked her to identify life goals. She began mentoring me. She wanted me to publish a poem I wrote for her when she was four. After a year of ignoring her, I began to wonder, “What if?”
I found an illustrator, Anni Matsick, who agreed to undertake this project with an unknown, unpublished author. We worked together with Chris Schechner, (art director), and published books one and two. Bonnie Hawkins will be illustrating book 3 which is an underwater reef book where DLIMH tackles the subject of caring for Mother Earth.
Twenty-eight awards later, hundreds of school visits done, and thousands of hugs given, I am grateful to Lauren, my daughter, for her persistent encouragement to publish. It’s been an amazing journey. Not only is she the protagonist for the main character, but she single-handedly kicked me to get here.
Dinosaurs Living in My Hair is a poem I wrote for Lauren which details early childhood living with a mass of blonde curls. She would come in from play with sticks and dried leaves stuck in her tight spirals. It pulled and hurt to brush, comb, wash, etc. Parts of her hair never saw the light of day. I used to say, “Lauren, dinosaurs could live in that mess and I’d never know?” She’d shrug with those round blue sparkling eyes and dart out the side door to go play. Dinosaurs were the most ridiculous thing I could think of to say. I love the word imagination. I think to write the ridiculous is fun and persuade children think like this. Adults ask “Why dinosaurs?” Children know the answer is, “Why not dinosaurs?”

What has been your biggest challenge or obstacle?
As an author/publisher the most difficult challenge to overcome was to believe in myself; to take myself seriously. Traditionally published authors and traditional publishers used to make me feel ‘less than.’ It’s taken five years, but finally I acknowledge in my heart, I’m legit. It’s the students who cheer, laugh, applaud, hug, and love the books, who changed this for me. They are the best indicator of quality. I trust them.
Recently I founded, Literacy for Kids, Inc., (LFK) a non-profit corporation whose mission is to promote literacy, advocate education, support tolerance, and encourage acceptance. We are busy organizing our first AUTHORS: IN-Detroit program where the purpose is to unite award-winning authors/illustrators with students at a face-to-face event. Each child will receive an autographed book from the respective author assigned to their school. LFK will selectively choose titles which promote vocabulary, history, culture, acceptance, and self-esteem. Since we have seen firsthand how students respond with excitement and optimism when engaged in this personal educational experience, we felt Detroit Public Schools would be a great place to launch our first project.
I am currently editing my first YA novel. It’s a cross between John Paulson’s, “Hatchet” and John Grisham’s “Client.” I wanted to write a book where Mother Earth was also a character. We have a piece of property in the middle of nowhere which speaks to anyone who has walked there. It feels sacred. My intent is to paint this emotional reaction into words. What I lack these days however, is time.
The second DLIMH!2 book has been adapted into a Spanish version. This is currently being printed and will be available soon. The book series is in rhyme and it was challenging to give it a beat and rhythm through the translation. We look forward to its addition to our selections.

What has been your biggest “aha” moment or success?
Most of my writing ‘ah-ha’ moments come early in the morning when I first wake. A year ago, we travelled to Africa. I was able to write for three weeks continuously while overlooking a watering hole. Every animal imaginable within walking distance made its way to drink directly in front of me. The marmot monkeys flitted around the treetops overhead, the baboons strolled down the dried river eyeing me cautiously, the padded grey elephant feet snuck in quietly, and the towering giraffes blended into the trees miraculously. Sleeping outside in a tent for three weeks, waking and writing, falling asleep and waking to write again, was one of the most magical times of my life. The wee hours, with my sleep angels having answered manuscript questions, were still fresh in my mind when I started typing each day. I find if I’m struggling with writing plot – characters – etc. – I pose the question in my mind before sleep, invariably I have my answer in the morning. It’s best to keep my pencil and paper next to my bedside to jot down before the day erases all of my secrets. I think I have sleep fairies.

What are your interests outside of writing?
I am an avid fly-fisherman. It’s an activity my husband and I learned together about year ten (10/40) in our marriage. We began in Montana streams and rivers and fell in love with the speckled trout. Now, we fish most in saltwater. We divide our time between Michigan and the Florida Keys. I still prefer wading in water – but being in the back country of the everglades is also spectacular. I have a half-written book (where fly-fishing is a character), sitting in my bottom drawer. Time. It’s my worst enemy.

What authors do you like to read? What books have had a strong influence on you or your writing?
I read a lot of children’s book because I like to introduce my granddaughter to the world of words. She loves rhymes which makes me happy. I love Jory John’s humor; Kenneth Kraegel’s, “Green Pants,” is awesome. When I hear my son read Mo Willems’ “Pigeon Needs a Bath” out loud it tickles my heart. It’s funny when his scratchy voice and scrunched up eyes recite words like, “too hot, too cold, too deep . . . “, it makes a mother proud to see him interacting with his daughter and a book. My all-time favorites though will always be nursery rhymes. They speak to me.

Share some tips for other Authors or Aspiring Authors: What would you do differently? What would you do the same? Please share anything you think would be beneficial to those reading this.
My advice to anyone who wants to write is simply, “Write.” There’s no doubt the more you write the better you become. I love George Orwell’s advice when it comes to rules:
1. “Never use a metaphor, simile, or other figure of speech which you are used to seeing in print.”
2. “Never use a long word where a short one will do.”
3. “If it is possible to cut a word out, always cut it out.”
4. “Never use a foreign phrase, a scientific word, or a jargon word if you can think of an everyday English equivalent.”
5. “Break any of these rules sooner than say anything outright barbarous.”
He goes on to say notice the words ‘never’ and ‘always’ suggest these rules are absolute and must never be broken. Although with all rules – he was known to break them often!
I would add two more rules from my experience:
6. When proofreading take out the word “that” It’s seldom needed.
7. Editing is done best when work is read out loud. If you stutter through a sentence, something isn’t right.
We must encourage children to be creative and use their imaginations. It’s a dying art. God bless the children and the young at heart.

 

Renee Garrison is the award-winning author of The Anchor Clankers. To suggest an author interview, email her at rgarrison@bestversionmedia,com

Better than snacking

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Book vending machine

A great idea to get children reading comes from England Elementary School in England, Arkansas. It’s received tens of thousands of likes on Facebook and TV coverage on the local news channel out of Little Rock.

The Bookworm Vending Machine works very simply: Each week 50-60 golden tokens are awarded to children who show outstanding behavior. They use their coins to purchase a book from the vending machine. (The kids love it, because they keep their books and take them home.) Many schools reportedly have used student activity money to purchase the $4,000 machine manufactured by Global Vending Group.

Best of all, the book vending machine encourages reading and exceptional behavior in children. (Sounds like a great fundraising project for literacy groups, book clubs or writer’s groups!)

 

Renee Garrison is the award-winning author of The Anchor Clankers.

Renee interviews author Erika Kotite

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EK headshot3

Tell me about your background. Where you grew up, where you live now, education, work experience? Share some interesting things about yourself that we should know about.
I’m a California girl through and through. Born in San Francisco, raised in Santa Rosa, educated at UCLA (English Lit), married in a tiny town called Occidental. However, I’ve lived out of state, too. After graduating UCLA I headed east to make my mark in the NYC magazine world. I wanted to work for Conde Nast, of course. I ended up at a large PR firm and then moved back to California after a couple of years to take a job at Entrepreneur Magazine, where I stayed for 8 years. There I learned the art of interviewing and pulling together the various elements of a story that made it deep and interesting. (We called them “meatloaf” features.)
For seven years I was privileged to be the editor of Victorian Homes and Romantic Homes. It was there I discovered my love of historic architecture, and I became fascinated with outbuildings. This was the connection to my ultimate role: author of books about she sheds.

What inspired you to write this book? What is the story behind the story?
Many years after I left VH and RH — to work in book packaging and launch my own culinary blog, toquemag — a former colleague had also left the magazines to work in the book world, at Quarto. She was at an editorial meeting where the conversation was all around the new she shed phenomenon. Someone asked if there was any good writer out there who knew about she sheds, and my friend suggested me. I signed on with Quarto to write She Sheds: A Room of Your Own and then about 18 months later my proposal for a second she sheds book was accepted. (She Sheds Style: Make Your Space Your Own) This was extremely exciting as I knew how difficult it was to get a contract with a traditional publisher. I worked very hard and delivered what I consider two excellent books! So far the two books have sold more than 30,000 copies. Not bad for a niche home and garden book series!

What has been your biggest challenge or obstacle?
Writing a book is a tough slog no matter what kind or genre. For the sheds books, visuals were critical. This meant I also needed to acquire 150+ good-quality photos of all the sheds I featured and handled all of the required licensing paperwork, W9, invoicing, etc. from shed owners and photographers. We know English majors don’t like paperwork. 🙂
The second book was even more complex as I needed 175+ photos and 23 DIY projects that I had to produce (either myself or with other DIYers) and acquire rights to. So I worked harder than I ever have in my life, including late nights and weekends. Through that time, my beloved brother and a beloved sister died, making it excruciating to even think about work. Looking back I don’t even know how I got through it. But I guess we always do, somehow.

What has been your biggest “aha” moment or success?
I am happy to say that she sheds have become so popular I decided to make a whole business out of it. I met the greatest friend and colleague, Sabrina Contreras, and together we launched She Shed Living in 2018. The company is all about women finding their space and their creative inspiration, whether it’s in a backyard studio or a spare room or anywhere else. Our products — the books, a line of exterior paints called She Shades, garden supplies, spa products, lapel pins, potting benches and jewelry — is paired with our services as custom shed designers! We work with a company in central California that builds the sheds with reclaimed lumber and vintage windows. Sabrina and I work with the clients to design the walls and get the site prepared for installation. We also help with interior design if the client wants that. We are also building a membership through Facebook and ultimately through our website. It’s all very exciting — hectic, but exciting!

What authors do you like to read? What books have had a strong influence on you or your writing?
Well, I am VP of Publications for the Jane Austen Society of North America so…I read a lot of Jane Austen. Over and over. I am also a very big fan of the Laura Ingalls Wilder books and even wrote a screenplay around De Smet and Laura (set in contemporary time). John Steinbeck breathes the essence of California upon me whenever I open one of his books. I love all of his work. I’m not sure who has had an influence on my writing from these wonderful authors, though. I will tell you that Dominique Browning, who was the Editor In Chief of House & Garden for many years, greatly influenced me when I was writing my own editors notes in VH and RH. I love her voice and her poetic prose.

Do you write every single day? Any writing rituals?
Ugh. No writing rituals. I’m so busy building my business that I haven’t written anything more substantial than a monthly e-newsletter in nearly a year. And you know what? It is painful. I need to get back to my writing because that is what I’m best at. Through all kinds of badly chosen jobs I’ve had over the years I finally realized that I needed to stick to what I do best. I hope to get a third book deal, around outdoor living, when I get a chance to send out proposals. Then I’ll make me some rituals, which will definitely include coffee.

What are your interests outside of writing?
Through working on the she sheds projects I discovered I really like building and DIY projects. I’m improving my skills with power tools, including using a table saw. I love to sew and LOVE to read. My own little she shed is strictly for reading. I enjoy travel and just returned from a two-week trip to the UK with my husband and 3 children (22, 20, and 16).

Share some tips for other Authors or Aspiring Authors: What would you do differently? What would you do the same? Please share anything you think would be beneficial to those reading this.
I am a big fan of self-publishing. If I didn’t get that incredibly lucky break of knowing someone in the business, I would have definitely learned more about self-publishing and going that route. I’m having trouble (fears) finishing my screenplay so I wish I would have focused on that more. It’s not too late, though. I never feel like it’s too late, until I’m dead. We all as writers want to leave something valuable of ourselves behind. I’m no different. That’s our biggest privilege as well as our biggest challenge: to produce our absolute best and most truthful writings.

She Sheds book cover

Renee interviews author Florence St. John

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Janet Sierzant

Florence St. John writes psychological, nonfiction books about personality disorders. She is the author of, “The Codependence Trap,” a semifinalist for the Royal Palm Literary Award.

Tell me about your background. Where you grew up, where you live now, education, work experience? Share some interesting things about yourself that we should know about.
I was born in Brooklyn and grew up on Long Island. I relocated to Georgia and lived there for 26 years until I got divorced. I love Florida, traveling to Sicily and writing.

What inspired you to write this book? What is the story behind the story?
I started writing after I asked my father to record five cassette tapes about his life growing up in Brooklyn. My first book is Gemini Joe, Memoirs of Brooklyn. After that, I couldn’t stop writing.

What has been your biggest challenge or obstacle?
I was always told that I wasn’t college material, but then I relocated to Georgia and attended Kennesaw State University, where I received my Bachelors of Science degree.

What has been your biggest “aha” moment or success?
My biggest aha moment was realizing that I am codependent.

What authors do you like to read? What books have had a strong influence on you or your writing?
I usually like to read non-fiction books, especially memoirs, but my favorite book is the Joy Luck Club.

Do you write every single day? Any writing rituals?
I try to write every day, I have so many books in my head. I never get writer’s block. But I’m also a compulsive revisor. I have no problem correcting or tweaking my work.

What are your interests outside of writing?
Zumba and walking on the beach

Share some tips for other Authors or Aspiring Authors: What would you do differently? What would you do the same? Please share anything you think would be beneficial to those reading this.
My advice to other authors is… write because you enjoy it, not because you hope to be rich.

Renee Garrison is the award-winning author of The Anchor Clankers. To suggest an author interview, email her at rgarrison@bestversionmedia.com.

Front Cover